The causes of extreme obesity – I won’t have time to go into detail

I’m tired and haven’t had much caffeine yet. Maybe I will just start by listing every cause that I can think of.

But first, here is a list of things that are absolutely, completely, utterly and totally NOT A CAUSE of obesity:

1. Too much food (overeating)
2. Too little exercise (laziness)
3. Calories in greater than calories out.

So, "gluttony and sloth."

NOT CAUSES OF OBESITY.

That had to be said. Now that it’s been said, I can move on to the real causes.

But first, let me say, those things I just wrote up there ARE NOT CAUSES OF OBESITY.

Okay.

Especially severe obesity. It is possible to slightly lower your weight, temporarily, if you extremely starve yourself and exercise a lot, but this is absolutely a bad thing to do. Sometimes people even die from doing it.

So I will brainstorm every REAL cause I can think of. I do not know which of these things caused it in any particular person’s case. Anyone who’s already familiar with alternative medicine will know most of these.

1. Bottle feeding babies instead of breastfeeding
2. Vaccinations
3. Baby food, the particular type of foods used
4. Permanent deformities and abnormalities of the glands, including adipose tissue (fat) itself, which is also a hormone producing tissue and just as susceptible to deformity as anything else
5. Mother’s diet during pregnancy
6. Environmental pollution early in life, chemicals in the person’s house, chemicals over a large area outdoors, pesticides
7. Heavy metal poisoning. I forget which one it is, but there are, like, four major metals that cause severe poisoning: lead, mercury, cadmium, and arsenic. One of those, I think arsenic, or cadmium, causes obesity. Lead poisoning does the opposite, causing people to be unnaturally skinny and malformed. Mercury makes people crazy. Other metals might cause obesity too.
8. All drugs, especially psychiatric drugs. But you cannot stop taking these drugs suddenly, because sudden withdrawal can cause death, suicide, homicide, extreme behavior changes, and other severe withdrawal symptoms.
9. Birth control pills, listed separately for emphasis. Some people might think they’re "not a drug."
10. Permanent, chronic viruses that might have come from vaccines. The chemicals in vaccines are not the only causes of health problems – there are actually other live viruses in there that are not what you think they are, not the thing you believe you are getting vaccinated against.
11. Cesarean section births might possibly cause it. They cause a whole bunch of problems for the baby later in life.
12. Premature birth, giving birth to the baby on a schedule instead of when it comes out on its own, inducing labor – like cesarean sections, early birth causes all sorts of problems.
13. With cats and dogs, neutering is the cause. So, anything that affects hormones will cause it in humans. Some hormones are in food, such as rBGH, recomvinant bovine growth hormone, which is in milk, unless it says on the label that it’s from cows not treated with rBGH. This hormone definitely makes people fat. I gain weight if I drink a lot of milk with fake hormones in it.
14. Antibiotics.

There are many other things but I will have to add them if I think of them. The idea is, it isn’t the fault of the person who is fat, and it’s not under their control. The only thing under someone’s control (easily) is drug use, but it takes months to gradually lower the dosage of the deadly psychiatric drugs to prevent sudden withdrawal.

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7 Responses to “The causes of extreme obesity – I won’t have time to go into detail”

  1. nebbie916 Says:

    I’ve heard that spaying/neutering/castration is against the Torah, the Jewish holy book, because it is unethical to spay/neuter/castrate animals without a medical reason.

    Spaying and Neutering is wrong and against the Torah! by The Desert Tabernacle
    Wordpress site) https://thedeserttabernacle.wordpress.com/2016/04/01/spaying-and-neutering-is-wrong-and-against-the-torah/
    Blogspot site) http://www.thedeserttabernacle.com/2016/04/spaying-and-neutering-is-wrong-and.html

    Castrating animals without a medically necessary reason imposes a decision and surgery onto animals that they can’t consent to.

    Also, female dogs and cats don’t suffer being in estrous (a.k.a. heat) any more than any other female mammal would. Cats and dogs like and enjoy sex just as much as any other animal would. Female cats don’t get pregnant every time they go into heat, and they’ll keep themselves from getting pregnant whenever they don’t wish to get pregnant. In fact, intact female cats can go a long time without getting pregnant, even with intact toms in the vicinity. Despite what the pro-spay/neuter crowd likes to say, a female cat in heat does not always lead to a pregnant cat. Another thing is that intact cats, both male and female, aren’t all as awful to be around as the pro-spay/neuter crowd claims. One pet peeve I have is that the pro-spay/neuter crowd refers to a female cat in estrous who is calling and yowling, “crying.”

  2. Nicole Says:

    I wonder what the Halal guidelines say about it – they have rules for how animals are to be handled if they are going to be used for food. Maybe they have rules for all animals in general in addition to that.

    I once had a stray female cat, and I don’t know if she was spayed or not, but she actually seemed to be afraid of male cats, and avoided them if they expressed any interest. She never got pregnant in all the time I was with her (this was actually at my ex-boyfriend’s house, and she wasn’t my cat). I’ve never seen a female cat in estrus in person and I don’t know if they are actually in pain – I had the idea that it was something similar to menstrual cramps, but I don’t know. I think I might have heard a female bobcat in heat when I was camping, once. But if it is painful, like menstrual cramps, I would wonder if the cause of the pain is something preventable, like many other health problems. I have never been able to prevent my own cramps.

  3. nebbie916 Says:

    I’ve heard that in countries in Europe, especially in continental European and Scandinavian countries (like Norway and Sweden), people aren’t quite so brainwashed into the pro-spay-and-neuter mindset as people here in the USA are.

    It was illegal to desex dogs in Sweden until 28 years ago and it still is illegal to desex dogs in Norway unless it is medically necessary. Only 7 percent of female dogs in Sweden are spayed.

    It’s not just the Scandinavian countries that aren’t so brainwashed into the pro spay/neuter dogma. I’ve heard that Italy isn’t to brainwashed into this dogma either.

    Is Pig Castration Even Necessary? A Response To Joni Ernst’s Campaign Ad by The Dodo: https://www.thedodo.com/is-pig-castration-even-necessa-484488322.html

    Europe is also less brainwashed into the pro-castration paradigm than the US is as far as pigs are concerned.

    Hysterectomy Information: http://www.hysterectomyconsequences.com/home

    Not only is the spaying and neutering of animals most prevalent in the US, the hysterectomies done on women are most prevalent in the US as well. Only 10% of the hysterectomies performed on women are medically necessary.

  4. nebbie916 Says:

    I’ve heard that spaying and neutering ferrets, especially at 6-7 weeks, predisposes them to adrenal gland disease. Adrenal gland disease occurs when the adrenal glands overproduce androgens and/or estrogens. The disease causes an enlargement of and tumors on the adrenal glands. One sign of the disease is hair thinning or loss. It is most common in ferrets 3 years or older, but can occur as young as 2 years.

    On on the other hand, female ferrets have to mate or be bred (either by a hormonally and reproductively intact male ferret or hob or a vasectomized hob) if they are not spayed. Unlike other mammals, jills (intact female ferrets) can’t come out of estrous (or heat). Staying in estrous for any longer than a month causes severe health problems like estrogen toxicity and aplastic anemia (suppressed bone marrow, bone marrow hypoplasia). They can even die from this.

    Dogs: There are not that many real benefits of spay/neuter in either males or females. Unspayed females get pyometra and spayed females get urinary incontinence, so ovary-sparing spay (OSS) would be best for them. Male dogs hardly reap any real benefit from neutering.

    Cats: Unneutered males can be harder to live with than unspayed females because the former tend to spray. Some of the risks of spay/neuter, like obesity, diabetes (which Burmese cats are more prone to getting), and FLUTD, affect the males more. There is no hard and fast rule here as intact cats of both sexes can be mannerly and feasible to live with and the behavioral inconveniences and problems (roaming, spraying, and yowling) are not guaranteed to occur.

    Ferrets: Female ferrets are pretty much the only animal that needs to be spayed for health reasons if it is not to be mated. Unneutered male ferrets are not quite as unlucky.

    Small Rodent Pets (Rats, Mice, Hamsters, Gerbils, Guinea Pigs, Chinchillas, and Degus): Can have a higher risk of complications from spay/neuter because they are so small (especially the smaller mice, hamsters, and gerbils) and they have a permenantly open inguinal canal. You can’t spay a female degu because of how their ovaries are positioned. Best to avoid the spay/neuter surgery if you can.

    What is your opinion on ovary sparing spays on female dogs?

  5. Nicole Says:

    My first thought on ovary sparing spays is that all surgery has some harmful effects. The abdominal wall has to be cut through, and then it has to heal shut with scar tissue, which is different from the original muscle. Leaving an empty space without a uterus in it changes the way all the other organs sit inside the body.

    Also, the uterus itself produces hormones. Women who get their uterus removed say that it changed them hormonally and emotionally even if they kept their ovaries.

    I don’t remember if this was about ferrets, but I remember reading about an animal that had to have an orgasm, and if it did not, then it would die. The article or factoid or whatever I read said they gave them some kind of object in the cage for that purpose. (I can’t get to the internet to look it up right now because I’m camping at the moment.) That makes me wonder if the same is sufficient for a ferret so that maybe you could avoid spaying them.

  6. nebbie916 Says:

    Spaying and Neutering is also essentially an unnatural and immediate menopause. Only human women naturally have menopause.

    Another thing I’ve heard about is that one way of conserving the Scottish wildcat (called Felis silvestris grampia), a critically endangered ecotype of the European wildcat (Felis silvestris silvestris) that originally inhabited all of Britain but was expirated from England and Wales in the 1800s, is to spay and neuter the domestic cats and more domestic-looking hybrids that are in Scotland and Northern England. This is done to keep domestic cats (part of Felis silvestris lybica, called Felis silvestris catus) from interbreeding with the native wildcats there and to keep the purity of said wildcats as well.

    And I thought inbreeding (also called incest) was worse than interbreeding. Interbreeding brings hybrid vigor, and considering that Scottish wildcats are critically endangered, I think that they would need more genetic diversity, not less. Maybe bringing some mainland European wildcats into Scotland would help. The genetic diversity of the endangered Florida panther was helped by bringing cougars from Texas into Florida.

    Can you think of a way to keep the Scottish wildcat from becoming extinct without doing unnatural, body-violating surgeries on domestic cats?

  7. Nicole Says:

    Exactly, I don’t think spaying and neutering local housecats to keep them away from wildcats is useful at all. Better to have some mixed breed half-wildcats, half-housecats than to have no wildcats at all. I don’t believe in breed purity, except in some very special situations – if I were going to go dog sledding across Antarctica, I wouldn’t want to bring a bunch of short haired Boxer dogs, I would want something like the Eskimo sled dog and similar dogs, because they really are better able to handle the extreme cold. Housecats are able to survive in a climate like England and Scotland as feral cats, so it’s not really going to weaken the wildcats somehow if they mix. And anyway, the best way to save wild animals from dying is to make major changes in society that aren’t going to happen anytime soon, such as getting rid of the highways that the animals always get killed on, or at least putting fences around them or something, I don’t know. And preventing people from covering everything everywhere with concrete and asphalt, and prevent them from chopping down every single tree everywhere, so that wild animals will have some place to live. But aside from that, I have no objection to the idea of letting housecats breed with the wildcats.

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